How To Win …

imagesThe famous Garland Rice quote never held more meaning post election than, “It’s not whether you win or lose but how you play the game,” that counts. Despite which side of the party politics you find yourself on this week, one lesson can be learned from this election process, and that is how to win. Playing the winning game when it comes to looking for a job, or angling for a promotion or if you are considering a new career means you have choices to make in how you show up for the challenge. Whether you believe a winner is born or made doesn’t really matter, what matters is how badly you want something and all that you will you do to get it.

There has been a lot of bad behavior associated with the high-stakes game of winning. That does not mean you have to choose to act in a way that is not comfortable or natural to you. Believing in who you are and what you want is the most important thing when it comes to your chances of winning. That passion for what you want whether it’s a title change, a salary increase or an altogether new career means you have what it takes to fight the good fight no matter what obstacles lay in wait.

There are only two things that will assure you win the top prize of whatever it is you are after. That is, being clear and staying focused. When you are clear on your direction, your message and what you want to accomplish and can see the end game; nothing will deter you from going for the win. When you remain focused on the path towards success, keep the plan simple and stay true to what you believe in, you can’t help but make it across the finish line. Now whether you come in first, second or last does not mean you lost. The only goal you have is to cross the finish line and make it towards your intended goal.

If you don’t succeed, you have learned valuable lessons along the way that will help you to move forward in the future. You can wallow in your failure, call the job game “rigged” or feel like you are being discriminated against if you don’t ultimately get what you want. Again, it’s your choice on how you show up to play the game, and your reaction of the outcome. Having the chops to go after what you want may not be easy but you have no one to blame but yourself if you don’t at least try.

Your job and your career choices are yours to win or to lose. How well you show up and engage with your audience, and are clear on what it is you want and remain focused, will determine if you come in first or in second place on the race to winning your new job.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

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And, on LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/pub/2/abb/50


Copyright © 2017 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting - The Career Rebel

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Falling Back

images-1Whether you are running for President, a promotion or are a finalist for a new job, how you choose to show up and take the win will determine how well you are equipped to do the job. It’s not so much about your credentials, your experience or whom you know that will determine whether you win or lose. How you project who you are and what you stand for will seal the deal in your efforts to take the top prize. You are your words and your actions. There is no taking it back once you put it out there. Choose carefully otherwise it will haunt you your entire career.

How you win depends on how well you stay true to your platform, your mission and your goals. It means not speaking out of turn, respecting your allies and adversaries and being humble about your position. But when you are compromised because of your gender, your race, your sexual orientation or any other protected class you are in essence in a free fall with nowhere to land. In a sad commentary on the state of affairs, we no longer have to worry about leaning in but whether we will even be allowed to participate in the same conversation, meeting or path to the top.

Fighting the good fight no longer means, raising the bar to a higher standard. It no longer implies when “They go low, you go high.” What do you need to do to ensure you get heard no matter what your position or point of view? Whether you lost out as a job finalist, or on a promotion or as President of the free world, how you move forward after the fall will depend on who you are as a person not what gender, color, orientation, religion you are wrapped in. Being fearful because there are no other options will surely make it hard to figure out your next right move.

When you are in free fall you can do a few things including hoping for a soft landing or waiting to hear the sound of breaking bone. How you choose your reaction to falling back will determine whether you ultimately survive the fall or not. You may feel like you can’t get up, move up or find the door. But falling back does not mean you can’t move forward. The path may be slow, longer, harder but so long as you remain clear and focused on your direction and choose your steps carefully, you will get to the finish line-one way or another.


Copyright © 2017 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting - The Career Rebel

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Job Greed

imagesYou may have been at this job thing for a while, looking for the right fit and the right opportunity to move your career in a new direction. Maybe a recruiter came knocking at your door one day and you decided to take a look at what is out there. Or, your boss decided to throw a lot of cash on the table in fear you might decide to start your own competing business and entice you to stay on board instead. However, you got to the position of being the most popular kid in the employee break room, you need to be able to separate fact from fantasy when it comes to weighing your options and negotiating your position forward.

You may have the perfect resume, your credentials are impeccable or you have a unique skill set that only a select few can appreciate. Leveraging your assets is a good thing but negotiating against yourself when it comes time to make a decision about your future, isn’t. What does that scenario look like? Well, let’s say you are making $100K a year now and someone is willing to offer you $200K but you decide you have more opportunity to go it on your own and tell them you want $300K to accept the offer because you have the potential to make more money on your own. This is where you need to know how to separate fact from fantasy. Negotiations on salary need to be about what you are actually making or have made in the past, and not on your perception of what you can make lest you appear “greedy” If your current employer or future employer is willing to in essence double your salary, you should not start asking for extra time off, an increase to your 401K match or some other variable which does not make you look like a savvy negotiator but more like a spoiled, petulant child!

When it comes to figuring out your worth you have to be in a position to have earned the level of income and stature your position demands on the open market. If you have not been offered and turned down an amazing salary for a certain amount of money or title in the past, then you can’t expect your current boss or prospective employer to make up the difference. You have to be earning or have earned a certain salary or position or benefit in order to effectively negotiate a more substantial offer moving forward.

To compare yourself to others who make more with no facts in your favor to back it up is not leveraging your assets, it starts resembling a hostage negotiation. Making unreasonable demands especially when you really, really want the opportunity in hand is a very dangerous game to play. It may be a seller’s market right now, where candidates have an upper hand due to a shortage of talent, but the tables can turn at any time and you don’t want to be the one standing in the Starbuck’s line wishing you had taken that last offer that came along but you passed because the vacation was more but not enough than what you previously had.

Whenever you are in a situation where someone is offering you more than what you currently have on many levels from base pay, to benefits, to title, to opportunity, be careful not to squander the offer because you are fixated on the details that in the big picture, don’t add up on your career balance sheet. Greed is good but not when you lose out on something you really want.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

Follow greenlightjobs on Twitter http://twitter.com/greenlightjobs

And, on LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/pub/2/abb/50


Copyright © 2017 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting - The Career Rebel

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How To Say “No” To Your Next Job Offer

unknownMost of focus on what questions we will ask when a new job offer is extended. We fantasize about the salary, the company or the office space. We focus on the vacation time, holidays, benefits and employee perks. Maybe you want to know how long it will take for you to move up the ladder, or maybe you are a seasoned executive concerned about the reporting structure and organizational chart. Whatever your station in the job offer chain is, you might not think of what you will say when you actually don’t want the job.

Most of you might think, “Well, that’s easy, I’d just say No!” Yet, when confronted with an offer, even a good offer, you may start to have second thoughts. It’s okay to process your feelings and concerns about accepting an offer that may or may not hold all that you desire. No one said you have to marry the first person that asks you. Same rule applies when you receive a job offer, you don’t have to accept the first one. You may be feeling pressure in your personal life to accept any job just to keep working and that’s ok. You are the only one who knows what is best for you and what will make sense financially and with your career choices.

When you are given a job offer that otherwise sounds too good to be true and something is telling you it does not sound right, when do you walk away?   Remember there are two-sides to every job offer. There is the giver and then there is the receiver. You can guess which role you play but you need to know how to play your part. When you still have questions about the job you are considering and you are far down the interview road, when is the right time to turn back? Just like with any relationship, you need to know when and how to deliver the message that, “I’m just not that into you.”

For some people this is not a difficult challenge. If you are comfortable assessing your options quickly and can easily weigh the pros and cons of a situation, then you are better at moving through the process of deliberation and coming to a quick conclusion. However, most of you don’t know when it’s time to pull out of the race and find yourself going further down the finish line than originally intended. This is where it can get difficult to say that you don’t want to take the process any further.

Keep in mind there are two players in this dance, you and your prospective boss or employer. Think of how you would feel if they got you all the way to the reference point only to tell you they’ve had a change of heart and decided not to move forward with little or not explanation-yes believe it or not it does happen. So if the shoe were on the proverbial other foot, how do you think your prospective new boss feels if you suddenly and far into the offer stage, decide you don’t want to go any further?

When you are faced with an opportunity that no longer feels right, it’s wise to cut ties before you get to the reference checking or salary negotiation process. Once you reach this point in the process you better be pretty sure you want the job especially if all other factors in the offer line up. The easiest way to avoid an uncomfortable situation is to be clear and transparent all the way through the process. If you think by playing your cards close to the vest is safe, guess again. No one appreciates that and it makes you appear cagey and deceptive. If any part of the offer is not to your liking speaking up immediately and stating your position, whether it’s how much in relocation you would receive, what your benefits or vacation might look like or who you ultimately will report to, is key in the offer process.

Sometimes there is no predicting when and how an offer will go south. Being clear on your expectations up front will help take the guesswork out for the recruiter or employer and ensure you are both on the same page when it comes to extending and accepting a job offer.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

Follow greenlightjobs on Twitter http://twitter.com/greenlightjobs

And, on LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/pub/2/abb/50

 

 


Copyright © 2017 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting - The Career Rebel

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Straight Outta College

unknownWell, maybe you are coming down from the summer party of a lifetime now that you have graduated from college. But, the holidays are upon us, and you still may be looking for that perfect job with diploma in hand! You may have been lucky to receive a scholarship to school. Or maybe, you were the beneficiary of a trust fund and you don’t need to worry about looming school debt like most of your classmates. But if you graduated in June, and you are still looking for a job in October, that diploma may not go as far as you or your parents thought.

Does a Barista job at Starbucks look appealing? Weighing the benefits of getting benefits over a higher hourly salary? Don’t worry you are not alone. Your college education may have provided the foundation for your ability to analyze, evaluate and communicate your ideas, but it may not have been the guarantee your parents were banking on when it came to immediate and sustainable employment. Don’t worry you are still not alone. Many recent college grads are struggling with job employment when they graduate. Sadly it does not matter whether you graduated from an Ivy League school or a local community college, a job is a job no matter what qualifications you can boast on a resume. These days it’s not any easier if you come from a top-tier college or university, the struggle to find a job straight outta college remains tough.

Setting expectations and career tracking before you graduate is something more colleges and universities need to spend more time and attention focusing on with their students. I know many who graduated and after two years in the job market, continue to re-evaluate their options, often considering higher education or an entirely different career track to open up more opportunities. The idea that you have to “work your way up the ladder” is not an appealing option to this generation of emerging talent. The notion that you have to put in your proverbial “dues” in order to get ahead is not something students focused on when they were getting ready to graduate and hit the job market.

Evaluating your options before you graduate does not mean you need to start focusing on your choices in your junior or senior year. It means you have got to figure it out your first week on campus otherwise, the next four years will be wasted on taking courses that may or may not help your chances at a job once you graduate. Getting clear on goals early on does not mean you can’t make changes along the way.   In fact, it’s strongly encouraged to change your career track before you graduate and take advantage of internal career counseling resources. Taking informational interviews while you are still in school helps you figure out if you are on the right road or not. Shadowing someone already in the job you think you might like might also helps you gain perspective in choosing the right career before you graduate.

Internships offer hands on experience in trying out and testing a field you may be interested in exploring before you earn that diploma. Setting expectations in terms of number of jobs in the field you are interested in and understanding the hiring salary helps you to evaluate your options and prepares you for what lay ahead. Forewarned is forearmed as someone once said and just because you have your diploma, does not mean you are automatically guaranteed a job. There is a little thing called “working for it” that comes to play with or without that degree. Remember, your career is your choice not your parents. Understanding what a job pays, what career options are available after school and beyond helps you figure out if you are willing to work for it and stick it out or need a higher degree in order to get ahead. It’s one thing to be top of your class, but when it comes to getting a job, it’s not just your SAT scores that will land you a job, it’s how you work all of your experience into the mix, education and otherwise.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

Follow greenlightjobs on Twitter http://twitter.com/greenlightjobs

And, on LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/pub/2/abb/50


Copyright © 2017 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting - The Career Rebel

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